Oral Language Program Overview

Our oral language program is designed for students that have some background in the language. Students who begin ATA at age 3 or younger are typically well prepared to begin this program at age 4 or 5. The program content is taught in both target languages. Parents are encouraged to review the content and discuss these topics in English with your child.

Lessons 1-40

This program will help your child build language skills needed to do well in school. We will be doing listening, speaking, and thinking activities, as well as listening to stories.

Here are some of the things learned in the first 40 lessons:
• name of the teacher and names of classmates
• names of the days of the week
• names of parts of the body
• words like in, on, under, and over

It will also give you some ideas for helping your child at home. 

Here are some things you can do with your child:
1. Ask your child to tell you about school projects and activities.
2. Look at family pictures together. Talk about the people in each picture and tell what they are
doing.
3. Play Follow the Leader. Do simple actions that your child can copy. Say what you are doing
(for example, "I'm taking off my shoe," "I'm putting my hand on top of my head," "I'm sitting
on the couch"). Ask your child to copy each action and repeat the sentence. Then let your
child be the leader.
4. Read to your child whenever possible. Go to the library. Ask your child to pick out books he
or she would like. As you read a story, ask your child questions about what is going on in the
story. Ask your child to tell about the pictures.

 

There are lots of ways you can help your child at home. Most important is to talk with your child—
talk about school, talk about daily activities, talk about the television show you are watching, talk
about what is going on in the neighborhood.

Lessons 41-70

Here are some of the things learned in lessons 41-70:

• names of shapes (square, circle, and so on)
• names of colors (red, blue, and so on)
• names of parts of things (flower= petals, stem, leaves, root, and so on)
• words that mean more than one (hands, dogs, and so on)
• what things are made of (metal, glass, plastic, and so on)

Here are some things you can do with your child at home to review what we've already learned:
1. Ask your child to name the days of the week. Make up a sentence about each day (for
example, "On Monday, I go to school"). Ask your child to repeat the sentence.
2. Let your child help you in the kitchen. Talk about what you are doing as you work. Use
words like first, next, then, and last.
3. Sing and act out songs such as "If You're Happy and You Know It, Clap Your Hands" and
"Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes."
4. Ask your child to name the parts of the body on a doll or an action figure.
5. Read to your child whenever possible. Go to the library. Ask your child to pick out books he
or she would like. As you read a story, ask your child questions about what is going on in the
story. Ask your child to tell about the pictures.

Lesson 71-110

New things we will be learning during lessons 71-110 are:
• names of jobs, places, and things in nature
• names of the months of the year
• the words some, all, none, and, and or
• words that describe things

Here are some things you can do with your child at home to review what we've already learned:
1. Choose a shape and find things in your home that have this shape. For example, for circle
you might find a plate, a clock face, a doorknob, a jar lid, and a button.
2. Play I Spy with colors. For example, choose an object in the room and say, "I spy something
red." Ask your child to name red objects in the room until the object you chose is guessed.
Then let your child choose an object, and play again.
3. Talk about the different parts of objects and how they are put together. For example, a chair
has legs, a seat, and a back; a book has a front cover, a back cover, and pages in the
middle.
4. Show your child more than one of a certain object (for example, a pair of shoes, three
buttons, five spoons). Ask your child to give you the name for one object (shoe, button,
spoon) and the name for more than one object (shoes, buttons, spoons).
5. Show your child something made of plastic. Ask your child, "What is this? What is it made
of? How do you know? What do you use it for?" Then have your child find other objects
made of plastic. Play the same game with things made of wood, metal, and glass.
6. Read to your child whenever possible. Go to the library. Ask your child to pick out books he
or she would like. As you read a story, ask your child questions about what is going on in the
story. Ask your child to tell about the pictures.

Lesson 111-150

New things we will be learning during lessons 110-150 are:
• names of the seasons
• words that tell about things that are the same or different
• words that tell who, what, when, and where

Here are some things you can do with your child at home to review what we've already learned:
1. Take a walk through your neighborhood. What kinds of jobs do people do there? Is there a
clerk in a store? A bus driver? A police officer? A firefighter? A letter carrier? How many
people doing different jobs can you find?
2. Ask your child to say the days of the week and the months of the year with you. Ask your
child what day it is and what month it is. What day comes before this one? What day comes
next week? What month comes before this one? What month comes next?
3. Play None, Some, All. Gather groups of things like milk jug lids, blocks, spoons, or buttons.
Take turns giving and following directions such as "Give me some of the spoons. Give me
none of the spoons. Give me all of the spoons."
4. Give your child choices in daily activities. Emphasize the word or. For example, "Do you
want to play inside or outside? Do you want to eat a peanut butter or tuna sandwich?"
5. Give your child a mix of objects (spoons, buttons, toy cars, blocks, and so on). Ask your
child to sort the objects into groups. Ask your child to tell about each group and why objects
fit into that group.
6. Read to your child whenever possible. Go to the library. Ask your child to pick out books he
or she would like. As you read a story, ask your child questions about what is going on in the
story. Ask your child to tell about the pictures.

Post Lesson 150

The listening, speaking, and thinking activities in this program have helped your child build language skills needed to do well in school. Here are some things you can do at home to help your child continue to improve in language skills:

1. Ask your child to dress dolls or paper dolls for each season. What does a person wear for
summer? Fall? Winter? Spring?
2. Play a game of Same and Different. Put two spoons, two forks, and two table knives on the
table. Pick up a spoon. Ask your child to show you an object that is the same, then show
you one that is different. Take turns. You can play this game with many other objects.
3. Take turns making up riddles about stories you know. Ask questions that start with who,
what, when, and where. For example, in Goldilocks and the Three Bears, "Who went to the
house of the three bears? What did she do there? When did she leave? Where did the
bears live?"
4. As you drive, ride, or walk through your neighborhood, talk about the sights, sounds, and
smells around you.
5. Play games such as Simon Says or Follow the Leader. Take turns being the leader.
6. Talk about your child's day. "What did you do? How did you feel? What did you see? What
did you have for lunch?"
7. Listen when your child talks. Say, "That's great. Tell me more."
8. Continue to read to your child whenever possible. Go to the library. Ask your child to pick
out books he or she would like. As you read a story, ask your child questions about what is
going on in the story. Ask your child to tell about the pictures. Remember, reading together
is one of the most important things you can do with your child.